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Artist Spotlight

Practicing Art Emboldens Talia Carbis to Create Without Pressure



Home » BLOG » Artist Spotlight » Practicing Art Emboldens Talia Carbis to Create Without Pressure

Talia is an artist from Brisbane, Australia. She is a wife and mum to 3 kids, just trying to fit creativity into her life wherever it fits! Talia explores topics like Judaism, and mental health through her art and enjoys making YouTube videos, and teaching kids art classes.

How do you live a creative life?

One day at a time. Every day looks different and is filled with different things. Some days I have time to access creativity in the form of art journaling or making youtube videos, and other days I access creativity by cutting nori into cute shapes of my kids’ lunchboxes. It’s never the same from one day to the next, and it can’t be too planned out or it’s just not going to work!

Do you put your life into your art journal? Or is it focused on technique?

I try to use my art journal as a way to process things I’ve been learning – sometimes techniques, and sometimes spiritual or emotional lessons.

What is your biggest barrier to creating?

Time – mostly in the form of how I prioritise things!

How do you get over that hurdle?

Change my priorities! Some weeks it’s not that simple, but it’s something everyone can work towards if it’s important to them. This Summer my art priority got down to once a week, and that’s okay! Once my big kids are back at school in February, I hope to re-prioritise and get to art more frequently. So being realistic with yourself about your other commitments (including the other things you want to do, not just what you have to do!) and about where your priorities truly lie is a really important step to overcoming the time issue!

What has been your biggest lesson when it comes to creating art?

You don’t have to be a great artist, or even a good artist to be like making art, and for it to be a valid hobby. While it’s true that we’re almost always trying to learn new things, and the practice we put into our art will see growth, we don’t have to excel and get to any certain level before our art becomes valid. My 3 year old’s art scribbles are equally as valid as my mediocre drawings, which are equally as valid as the art someone amazing like Caylee or Lauren is making! They’re not all as good as it each other, or equal in their skill, interest, or entertainment value, BUT they’re all valid art.

What is your favourite art journal page you’ve ever made? Why is it your favourite?

This was actually a very hard question! I did a page a few years ago in my junk journal. It’s of a very random blue background made with a brayer (I was just cleaning off the brayer on the page!), and then a cut out from a magazine of a girl. Instead of putting her up the right way, I put her upside down and cut her off at her feet, so it’s looks like she’s falling upside down off the page. I think what I love most about it is how simple it was to make, and how effectively it produced an emotive and thought provoking response for people who saw it. Whenever I look at it I’m reminded that art doesn’t need to be complicated or a complexity of layers – sometimes simple is best!

✨ Free class for creatives ✨

In How to Start Art Journaling, we’ll walk you through the art of art journaling, including how to start doing (🙌) and make your very first art journal page (even if you’ve never even opened an art journal before).

Have you ever actively disliked a page you’ve made? What did you do with it?

Yes, absolutely! I just turn the page, and move on. I’m not so much of a fix it and change kind of gal, and I’m not a glue the pages together or rip it out kind of girl either. I just turn the page and set to forget. I think this is why I don’t really have many “finished” art journals – they’re all full of pages I actively dislike, so I don’t feel any pressure to finish a journal.

Have you ever been through artist block? What did you do to overcome it?

Yes! Artist’s block (in my experience) isn’t so much about art, and more about the other things in life. Artist’s block often comes when I’m tired, overwhelmed, stressed, or unhealthy. So I try to look after myself in other ways. I eat some nourishing food, meditate, and get my priorities in order. Once I do these things I am almost always in a better place mentally, and my imagination and creativity is revived and this flows again in my art journal.

What’s the best art advice you’ve ever received?

1. Just start.

2. Everyone’s an artist.

I feel like these two go hand in hand – you won’t be any good until you start, so the sooner you start the sooner you’ll be at a stage where you feel comfortable!

WHAT DOES COMMUNITY DO FOR YOUR CREATING?

I really appreciate the inspiration – seeing the way people do things that I never would have considered before.

WHO WOULD YOU LIKE TO CELEBRATE IN THE GET MESSY COMMUNITY?

Laura Rahuba. She’s so encouraging on my instagram and I appreciate seeing her in my comment section and DMs!

Also, Serafine Bourne – because her style really speaks to my aesthetic, and I love to flick through her feed and feel renewed and inspired.

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Talia Carbis

Talia is an artist from Brisbane, Australia. She is a wife and mum to 3 kids, just trying to fit creativity into her life wherever it fits! Talia explores topics like Judaism, and mental health through her art and enjoys making YouTube videos, and teaching kids art classes.

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